Astros History

Houston Astros: Five worst moments in franchise history

HOUSTON, TEXAS - OCTOBER 30: Will Harris #36 of the Houston Astros reacts after allowing a two-run home run to Howie Kendrick (not pictured) of the Washington Nationals during the seventh inning in Game Seven of the 2019 World Series at Minute Maid Park on October 30, 2019 in Houston, Texas. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TEXAS - OCTOBER 30: Will Harris #36 of the Houston Astros reacts after allowing a two-run home run to Howie Kendrick (not pictured) of the Washington Nationals during the seventh inning in Game Seven of the 2019 World Series at Minute Maid Park on October 30, 2019 in Houston, Texas. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images) /
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FLUSHING, NY – OCTOBER 1986: Jose Cruz #25 of the Houston Astros batting against the New York Mets during the League Championship Series at Shea Stadium in October 1986. (Photo by Ronald C. Modra/Getty Images)
FLUSHING, NY – OCTOBER 1986: Jose Cruz #25 of the Houston Astros batting against the New York Mets during the League Championship Series at Shea Stadium in October 1986. (Photo by Ronald C. Modra/Getty Images) /

2. Final Out of Game 6 of the 1986 NLCS

This one was about as heartbreaking as it gets. The 1986 Astros were the best team in franchise history up to that point and had captured the NL West behind a Cy Young-winning season from Mike Scott. His dominance continued in the postseason as he won Games One and Four, allowing just one run in 18 total innings.

The Astros trailed the series 3-2 entering Game Six, knowing they had Scott on deck to pitch a potential Game Seven. It was the equivalent to the Astros having Gerrit Cole in 2019 — Scott was the best pitcher on the planet at that time, and it felt like certain victory with him on the mound. They just had to get him there.

Game Six in the Astrodome saw the hometown nine take a 3-0 lead in the first inning and hold that lead until the ninth. Starter Bob Knepper gave up a triple, a single and a double to make it a 3-2 game before he was pulled for closer Dave Smith, who gave up two walks and then a sac fly to tie the game.

The Mets scored in the top of the 14th, but Billy Hatcher homered in the bottom of the inning to tie it up again. The Mets then scored three in the top of the 16th, but the Astros again refused to quit. They pushed two runs across on singles by Hatcher and Glenn Davis, but with the tying run on second, Kevin Bass struck out to end the game.

It ended what could have been a dream season for the Astros, and it was especially heartbreaking knowing they could have won Game Seven with Scott on the mound. The Mets would go on to defeat the Red Sox in the World Series, making you really wonder what could have been.

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