Astros: Best individual seasons in club history – outfield

UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1974: Cesar Cedeno #28 of the Houston Astros looks on during an Major League Baseball game circa 1974. Cedeno played for the Astros from 1970-81. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1974: Cesar Cedeno #28 of the Houston Astros looks on during an Major League Baseball game circa 1974. Cedeno played for the Astros from 1970-81. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images) /
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NORTH PORT, FLORIDA – MARCH 10: George Springer #4 of the Houston Astros at bat against the Atlanta Braves during a Grapefruit League spring training game at CoolToday Park on March 10, 2020 in North Port, Florida. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)
NORTH PORT, FLORIDA – MARCH 10: George Springer #4 of the Houston Astros at bat against the Atlanta Braves during a Grapefruit League spring training game at CoolToday Park on March 10, 2020 in North Port, Florida. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images) /

10. Steve Finley – 1992

We’ve talked about Finley recently, how he came to Houston in the Glenn Davis trade and left in the Caminiti deal. In between, he totaled 5.7 WAR in a strong 1992 season in which he hit .292/.355/.407 with 29 doubles, 13 triples, five homers, 55 RBIs and 44 stolen bases.

9. Carl Everett – 1999

Everett was only in Houston for two seasons, but they were good ones. His best was 1999 when he hit .325/.398/.571 with 33 doubles, 25 homers, 108 RBIs and 27 stolen bases, totaling 5.8 WAR. He was traded to the Red Sox following the season for a player with the same last name but no relation – Adam Everett.

8. Terry Puhl – 1980

The first part of Puhl’s career was better than the second, and his best year was 1980. He hit .282/.357/.419 with 24 doubles, 13 homers, 55 RBIs and 27 stolen bases. This might not seem overly impressive, but considering the era in which he played, it was worth 6.2 WAR.

7. Moises Alou – 1998

Alou played three excellent seasons with the Astros, and this was his first. He hit .312/.399/.582 with 34 doubles, 38 homers and 124 RBIs, making the All-Star team and finishing third in the MVP voting. This was good for 6.2 WAR, though he would unfortunately miss the next season due to a torn ACL.

6. Jose Cruz – 1984

Cheo had so many great seasons with the Astros, but this one takes the cake by an eyelash. He totaled 6.3 WAR in 1984 by hitting .312/.381/.462 with 28 doubles, 13 triples, 12 homers, 95 RBIs and 22 stolen bases. He also walked more than he struck out and finished eighth in the MVP voting.

5. Richard Hidalgo – 2000

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This was Hidalgo’s big year, and it’s a shame he was never able to replicate it. In the team’s first year in the new stadium, he broke out with a .314/.391/.636 line to go along with 42 doubles, 44 homers and 122 RBIs, totaling 6.3 WAR. How he only finished 20th in the MVP voting is beyond me.

4. George Springer – 2019

Springer is our late entrant into the contest. Despite playing in only 122 games, he totaled 6.4 WAR this past year by hitting .292/.383/.591 with 39 homers and 96 RBIs. If he’d not missed some time with injury, he could’ve moved up a spot or two. Maybe he still can if his Astros career continues.

3. Lance Berkman – 2001

We already saw Berkman on our first base list, and he’s here too with his first big season in the majors. He mashed to the tune of a .331/.430/.620 line with 34 homers, 126 RBIs and a majors-leading 55 doubles. He made his first All-Star team and had the first of four top-five MVP finishes, compiling 6.5 WAR.

2. Jimmy Wynn – 1965

The Toy Cannon’s first full big league season was his best from a WAR standpoint, as he totaled 7.4 in 1965. He hit .275/.371/.470 with 30 doubles, 22 homers, 73 RBIs and 43 stolen bases. He would go on to put up better power numbers and better offensive campaigns, but his all-around numbers make this one his best.

1. Cesar Cedeno – 1972

The top spot goes to the guy who, at his peak, may have been the best player in franchise history. He hit .320/.385/.537 with 22 homers, 82 RBIs, 55 stolen bases and a league-leading 39 doubles. He was an All-Star for the first time, finished sixth in the MVP voting and won his first Gold Glove. Only 21 at the time, he compiled 8.0 WAR and established himself as a true five-tool player.

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