Players You Forgot Were Astros: Yankees manager Aaron Boone

BRADENTON, FL - MARCH 8: Infielder Aaron Boone #8 of the Houston Astros sets for play against the Pittsburgh Pirates March 8, 2009 at McKechnie Field in Bradenton, Florida. (Photo by Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images)
BRADENTON, FL - MARCH 8: Infielder Aaron Boone #8 of the Houston Astros sets for play against the Pittsburgh Pirates March 8, 2009 at McKechnie Field in Bradenton, Florida. (Photo by Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images) /
facebooktwitterreddit

In this installment of the Players You Forgot Were Astros series, we highlight the brief Houston career of Aaron Boone.

While watching the Astros defeat the Yankees in the postseason yet again, it’s easy to forget that the guy calling the shots from the opposing dugout once wore a Houston uniform. That’s right, folks — Aaron Boone used to be an Astro.

The Astros signed him as a free agent prior to the 2009 season, which would end up being his last season in the majors. He underwent open heart surgery in March 2009 before he even played a game for his new team. He missed nearly all of the season, but returned in September.

Boone played in only 10 games that season, failing to get a hit in 14 plate appearances. The only time he reached base was when he was hit by a pitch. He retired after the season and immediately went into broadcasting.

More from Climbing Tal's Hill

Of course we all know what happened after that, as he’s served as manager of the Yankees for the past two seasons. His playing career was pretty good before he came to Houston, and it’s what helped him get that managerial gig in New York.

Aaron Bleeping Boone

Boone started his career in Cincinnati, primarily playing third base. He eventually became the team’s everyday starter, playing in all 162 games in 2002 while hitting 26 homers. His 2003 season was even better, as he made his first and only All-Star team.

He was traded to the Yankees during that season and compiled a total of 24 homers and 96 RBIs that year. He forever became part of Yankees lore, however, with his dramatic extra-inning walk-off home run against the Red Sox in the ALCS to send the Yankees to the World Series.

He never reached those heights again, but still put together a solid career. By the time he signed with the Astros at age 35, he’d seen the highs and lows, but his career was nearly over. His time in Houston wasn’t memorable, but he’s a memorable person in recent baseball history.

facebooktwitterreddit