Astros: Four free agent starting pitchers who could be fits

WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 07: Rich Hill #44 of the Los Angeles Dodgers delivers in the first inning against the Washington Nationals in game four of the National League Division Series at Nationals Park on October 07, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Will Newton/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 07: Rich Hill #44 of the Los Angeles Dodgers delivers in the first inning against the Washington Nationals in game four of the National League Division Series at Nationals Park on October 07, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Will Newton/Getty Images) /
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CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – SEPTEMBER 16: Starting pitcher Cole Hamels #35 of the Chicago Cubs delivers the ball in the first inning against the Cincinnati Reds at Wrigley Field on September 16, 2019 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Quinn Harris/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – SEPTEMBER 16: Starting pitcher Cole Hamels #35 of the Chicago Cubs delivers the ball in the first inning against the Cincinnati Reds at Wrigley Field on September 16, 2019 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Quinn Harris/Getty Images) /

Cole Hamels

Admittedly, this possibility would be on the high end of the financial spectrum. Hamels will probably command more money than any of the other possibilities on this list, but he will still come far cheaper than some of the top names.

MLB Trade Rumors predicts him to land a two-year, $30 million deal, which would not be unreasonable. The Astros would probably be fine committing to Hamels for two years, but it might not even take that. Hamels has said he would be open to a one-year deal with a contending club.

In fact, that’s what he’s looking for the most — a chance to win a ring. The Astros have as good of a chance as anyone to give him that, and they have a clear need in the rotation. Hamels could be a natural fit for several clubs, but Houston would undoubtedly be one of them.

As far as his performances goes, he’s no longer the ace he once was, but he’s still an effective mid-rotation starter. He pitched to a 3.81 ERA in 27 starts for the Cubs in 2019 after putting up a 2.36 ERA in 12 starts for them in 2018. However, he had a 4.72 ERA for the Rangers that season before the trade to Chicago.

He’s an accomplished postseason pitcher, holding a 3.41 career playoff ERA. He was also the MVP of the 2008 NLCS and World Series with the Phillies. Having that kind of pedigree in your rotation wouldn’t hurt at all. One a short deal, it’s worth a shot.

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