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Correa won’t sign early long-term deal with Astros

Apr 10, 2017; Seattle, WA, USA; Houston Astros shortstop Carlos Correa (1) reacts after striking out with the bases loaded against the Seattle Mariners during the eighth inning at Safeco Field. Seattle defeated Houston 6-0. Mandatory Credit: Joe Nicholson-USA TODAY Sports
Apr 10, 2017; Seattle, WA, USA; Houston Astros shortstop Carlos Correa (1) reacts after striking out with the bases loaded against the Seattle Mariners during the eighth inning at Safeco Field. Seattle defeated Houston 6-0. Mandatory Credit: Joe Nicholson-USA TODAY Sports /
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Carlos Correa’s agent says his client is not interested in signing an early long-term deal with the Astros.

Apr 10, 2017; Seattle, WA, USA; Houston Astros shortstop Carlos Correa (1) reacts after striking out with the bases loaded against the Seattle Mariners during the eighth inning at Safeco Field. Seattle defeated Houston 6-0. Mandatory Credit: Joe Nicholson-USA TODAY Sports
Apr 10, 2017; Seattle, WA, USA; Houston Astros shortstop Carlos Correa (1) reacts after striking out with the bases loaded against the Seattle Mariners during the eighth inning at Safeco Field. Seattle defeated Houston 6-0. Mandatory Credit: Joe Nicholson-USA TODAY Sports /

For those hoping the Astros would lock up Carlos Correa for the long term, those hopes have been dashed. Correa’s agent, Greg Genske, said his client is not interested.

“Carlos is never going to do an (early) multiyear contract,” Genske said.

Still only 22, Correa is making just $535,000 this season. He’s eligible for arbitration beginning in 2019 and is due to hit free agency before 2022, shortly after his 27th birthday.

This is not entirely surprising news, as Correa would likely maximize his earning power by going year-to-year. If he remains healthy and productive, he could make big money in his arbitration years, possibly even setting records for a player with his amount of service time.

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The Team’s Situation

For the Astros, signing Correa to an early extension could save them money down the road. They have already done so with Jose Altuve, who is set to make just $4.5 million this year. The Astros also hold club options on Altuve for $6 million in 2018 and $6.5 million in 2019. Altuve undoubtedly would be making more if he had gone year-to-year.

Of course, the team also signed Jon Singleton to an early extension. Singleton is making $2 million this year and isn’t even on the 40-man roster anymore. He has one more guaranteed year before the Astros can decline his 2019 option and pay a $500,000 buyout.

For Correa, refusing to sign an early extension means he’s betting on himself, and it may prove to be a lucrative bet for him. If he continues to improve, he could command an enormous contract once he reaches free agency, and someone will give it to him.

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