Astros: 3 bullpen trade targets to fortify pitching staff

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Houston Astros, Sam Selman

Houston Astros, Sam Selman (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)

The Houston Astros pitching staff is really coming around, but that doesn’t mean this bullpen can’t still be shored up a bit. here are three candidates.

The Houston Astros bullpen has seen near double-digit professional debuts this year, with so many never-before-seen youngsters and oldsters alike toeing the rubber and trying to keep the Astros in games.

The Astros bullpen ERA has steadily risen to thirteenth in the majors as of writing, but they’re also fourth-worst in baseball at surrendering free passes. That’s not the kind of thing that boasts sustainability. The Astros still need improvement.

That can come at the trade deadline, if James Click so desires. Sure, there’s a value in stocking the bullpen with youngsters—they get some great trial-by-fire experience. But in the meantime, this club is using some of their prime offensive weapons, who may be leaving at the end of the season, without much hope of protecting leads.

The Houston Astros still need bullpen help, so here are some candidates

Are we really ready to sacrifice this year for the sake of getting experience to young bullpen arms? Or would it be better to invest in a vetted reliever or two to make a real shot at making it to another World Series?

If the latter is opted for, here are three candidates that Click should be looking at.

3. Sam Selman, San Francisco Giants

Part of the struggle with trades is picking teams who are out of the race. The Giants aren’t out of the race just yet, but that may change in the near future, especially with the Dodgers running away with the division.

So Sam Selman. The massively improved late-bloomer who is suddenly such a reliable bullpen arm that he’s given up just three earned runs in 10 innings pitch.

Selman ticks a lot of the boxes—he doesn’t walk many, he avoids home runs, he’s a strikeout wizard. All of these things combine to make him a lucrative option that wouldn’t command that big of a return. He’s 29 years old, he’s not a long-term fix, but in his second year in the pros, he’s proving to be a reliable bullpen arm on an unreliable team.

How about making him a reliable bullpen arm on a reliable team?

Also, he’s a lefty.

Option No. 2 coming up.

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