Astros Report Card: Grading the outfielders’ 2019 season

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HOUSTON, TEXAS - OCTOBER 21: The Houston Astros celebrate after defeating the New York Yankees by a score of 4-0 to win Game Seven of the American League Championship Series at Minute Maid Park on October 21, 2017 in Houston, Texas. The Houston Astros advance to face the Los Angeles Dodgers in the World Series.(Photo by Bob Levey/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TEXAS - OCTOBER 21: The Houston Astros celebrate after defeating the New York Yankees by a score of 4-0 to win Game Seven of the American League Championship Series at Minute Maid Park on October 21, 2017 in Houston, Texas. The Houston Astros advance to face the Los Angeles Dodgers in the World Series.(Photo by Bob Levey/Getty Images) /
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Josh Reddick:  C+

Josh Reddick had a down year as far as his career numbers go and he would probably be the first one to tell you so. But compared with the rest of the American League, he was mostly in the middle of the pack offensively and above average defensively.

His slash line for 2019 was .275/.319/.409 with an OPS of 89. Those stats rank around the fourth-worst numbers in his 11-year career. His wRC+ of 94 and 1.0 WAR both place him place 35th in the American League.

Defensively he fared better and we all can remember his home run-saving catches at the wall. He had an rdrs of 9 placing him just above Brantley for 9th in the league.

Reddick had a great season when he was brought into Houston in 2017, but his numbers have declined in the last couple of years. He is coming up on his final year of a 4-year contract that pays him $13 million in 2020. With Kyle Tucker coming onto the scene, it wouldn’t surprise me to see Reddick’s name floating about in trade rumors this offseason.

Jake Marisnick:  C-

Marisnick has gotten in more regular playing time these last five years appearing in 100 games or more since he came up to the Major Leagues in 2013. This season’s offensive contributions rank down toward the bottom of those five years.

He slashed .233/.281/.383 with an 80 OPS+. His 1.1 WAR was just above Reddick at 34th in the league and his 86wRC+ was ranked 44th in the AL. Marisnick’s rdrs of five placed him 18th in the league defensively. Although, his speed did come in handy at times out in the field and on the bases and many times when the Astros had a slim lead he would come in to replace Reddick.

Marisnick found himself in a competition last Spring just to make the 25-man roster. I feel he could find himself in that same situation this offseason, that is if he isn’t used as trade bait.

Kyle Tucker:  B

Kyle Tucker was called up in September of this year and took more advantage of the opportunity than he did in his July call-up of last season. So much so, he even made the postseason roster for the ALDS, ALCS, and the World Series.

Many people were calling the top recruit a bust last season when he ended the season with a BA of .141. In his 28 games and 72 plate appearances last year, he had no home runs, just four RBIs and one stolen base.

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The patience of the front office seems to be paying off. In the same amount of PA as last year, he slashed .269/.319/.537 with an OPS+ of 118, including four homers and five stolen bases. It will be fun to see what he does this upcoming Spring Training, but it wouldn’t surprise me to see him in the starting lineup come regular-season time in 2020.

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