Astros News

Houston Astros: Prospect Review – Ross Adolph OF

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WEST PALM BEACH, FL - MARCH 09: Derian Gonzalez #71 of the St. Louis Cardinals is silhouetted as he warms up before a spring training game against the Houston Astros at FITTEAM Ball Park of the Palm Beaches on March 9, 2018 in West Palm Beach, Florida. (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images)
WEST PALM BEACH, FL - MARCH 09: Derian Gonzalez #71 of the St. Louis Cardinals is silhouetted as he warms up before a spring training game against the Houston Astros at FITTEAM Ball Park of the Palm Beaches on March 9, 2018 in West Palm Beach, Florida. (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images) /
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Houston recently acquired Ross Adolph, and two other prospects, from the Mets in exchange for JD Davis. He now ranks as the #30 prospect for the Astros.

That beautiful smell of grass, dirt, and pine tar is looming over the horizon. Pitchers and catchers are due to report in just one month, and the excitement is building. In the days leading up to February 13th, let’s dive into the Astros‘ Top 30 prospects and learn a little more about those prospects we don’t hear much about starting with Ross Adolph.

Houston Astros Prospect #30: Ross Adolph – OF (Tri-City Valley Cats – Low A Affiliate)

The Early Years:

The 6-1 left-handed hitting Ross Adolph hails from Findlay, Ohio, where he graduated from Van Buren High school. As a senior, the young prospect hit a robust .595 average while collecting seven doubles, seven triples and three home runs, all the while stealing 26 bases. This success would follow him to the University of Toledo, where as a freshman Adolph would bring in a .268 average with six doubles, one triple, and was fourth on his team in hits with 44, a feat he accomplished while only starting 45 games.

As a sophomore Ross continued to hone his batting acumen, hitting .272 and slugging .484, and gathered 17 multi-hit games. 2018, however, was when Ross really broke out. Adolph finished the year with a line of .322 / .445 / .654. This feat saw him tie the single-season home run record with fifteen, collect fourteen doubles, six triples, and twelve stolen bases. He also started every game in center field, tying teammate Brad Boss as the only Toledo Rocket to do so.

The Draft:

As 2018 loomed, draft experts lauded his bat, however, they had several question marks with his glove and his health. Citing multiple surgeries to his knee and an average arm, this placed Adolph below the Top 200 of MLB Prospects. As a result, the Mets drafted him in the 12th round of the MLB Draft.

Brooklyn Cyclones, Mets Rookie Affiliate:

Despite being drafted in the 12th round, Adolph’s bat and plate discipline were on full display in his first year of pro ball. Finishing the season with a .276 / .348 / .509 slash line, he gathered nine doubles, seven home runs, and a staggering twelve triples. Defying the critics that his knee wouldn’t hold up, Ross also swiped fourteen bases.

As a left-handed hitter, his swing is smooth and consistent but some holes to fill. He does swing and miss quite a bit, 52 times in 61 games to be exact, he does balance this out with 21 walks. With the right progression, this number should be lowered.

The Future:

In January, Ross and two other prospects were sent to the Astros. Being a raw-power bat from the left side, this gives Ross Adolph a massive advantage in terms of movement through the system. With only Seth Beer being the front-runner of power from the left side, Ross could be the consistent left-handed hitter the Astros are desperate to have. Add in the fact he is smooth on the base paths, the Astros have a potential 20-20 outfielder in their ranks.

Next. Astros analysis: Expect another season of high contact rate from the lineup in 2019. dark

Astros fans have seen it before, with the likes of Yordan Álvarez, Tony Kemp and Tyler White. Adolph has the makings to make a massive jump from #30 overall prospect to quite possibly the Top 10 next year. Barring injury or major drop off, Ross Adolph is a name to remember.

Ceiling Player Projection: Carlos Gonzalez
Floor Player Projection: Corey Dickerson

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